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Key Stage 3

"Arithmetic is being able to count up to twenty without taking off your shoes"

Mikey Mouse

We begin by developing mathematical fluency through learning the fundamentals of number and calculation, developing a confident recognition, understanding and manipulation of real (natural and rational) numbers through a variety of approaches and representations.

As students' mastery of number begins to develop, we move on to abstract generalisation with the introduction of the grammar of algebra, alongside the introduction of the grammar of formal geometry and statistics.

The emphasis of the curriculum is on developing a numerical confidence which comes from practising the foundations of the discipline. Throughout their journey, students only move onto the next stage when they have achieved a level of competence within the mastery curriculum,

For most students, the journey starts with the representation of number in decimal, percentage, and fractional forms, and being able to calculate and manipulate them fluently,

We consider the growth of the number line, from counting numbers and rational numbers, to the introduction of zero and negative numbers. We look into factors and multiples of a number and consider one of the oldest pastimes of number theory: prime numbers.

We gain an insight into how prime numbers have become the core of internet security. We develop logic and strategic problem-solving by identifying patterns and recognising proportional relationships.

The study of geometry begins with construction and measurement using the angle measure of degrees.

We develop students' concrete understanding before later treating shapes in a more abstract way, and introducing calculations using basic angle facts of shapes. We take a similar approach with measuring area and volume, eventually starting to generalise results with formulae. We also look at how the Cartesian coordinate system is used to find connections between graphs and functions.

We introduce the students to statistics, with calculations derived from simple data representations such as bar charts, pictograms and line graphs. This extends to average calculations and simple analysis of the data produced.

Solving equations, collecting like terms and factorising are all fundamental skills required. These skills form a web, linking topic areas together. For example, angles in a polygon with algebraic values and average calculations with values missing.

We build on the grammar, promoting conceptual understanding in the form of rhetoric, allowing students to choose the best method to solve a problem. As we move on from numerical calculations, we start to try to generalise results with the introduction of the grammar of algebra. This is really the bedrock of the subject for those who will eventually go on to study it at a higher level where fluency is a must.

Solving equations, collecting like terms and factorising are all fundamental skills required. These skills form a web, linking topic areas together. For example, angles in a polygon with algebraic values and average calculations with values missing.

We build on the grammar, promoting conceptual understanding in the form of rhetoric, allowing students to choose the best method to solve a problem.

22/07/2021